Phase 1 Update Touts Expanded List of Facilities Approved to Export Meat, Poultry and Dairy to China

Posted on Thu, 05/21/2020 - 13:00

USDA and the Office of the U.S. trade Representative (USTR) provided another update on progress implementing the Phase 1 Economic and Trade Agreement between the U.S. and China. The agreement took effect Feb. 14. The related release included the following comments: “These are difficult times for both our countries. It is important that we each continue to work to make our agreement a success.”

Because of this continued progress due to the agreement:

  • U.S. blueberries and California Hass avocados can now be exported to China. In 2019, China imported a record volume of fresh fruits and vegetables exceeding $8.6 billion.  
  • U.S. barley for processing, along with the forage products Timothy hay, alfalfa hay pellets and cubes, and almond meal pellets and cubes can now be exported to China. In 2019, China imported $1.5 billion of barley used as feed and for malt beverage production, and a record $500 million of forage products. 
  • In recent weeks, China updated its lists of U.S. facilities eligible to export beef, pork, poultry, seafood, dairy, and infant formula products to China. China’s lists now include 499 beef, 457 pork, 470 poultry, 397 seafood, and 253 dairy and 9 infant formula facilities. As a result of these actions, more U.S. facilities are eligible to export U.S. food and agricultural products to China than ever before. USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service continues to update its export library, which provides additional guidance for U.S. meat and poultry meat exporters, including information related to the scope of products that may be exported to China, China’s labeling requirements, and other guidance.
  • China published on May 15 a new domestic standard for dairy permeate powder for human consumption that will allow imports of this product from the United States in the future. In 2019, China imported nearly $12 billion of dairy products from around the world. 

China continues to implement its tariff exclusion process in an attempt to facilitate imports of U.S. commodities. USDA continues to publish guidance for U.S. exporters seeking to participate in this process (USDA Global Agricultural Information Network). USTR is continuing to process and where appropriate grant exclusions of products from China. USDA also is implementing its obligations under the agreement.