Winter Wheat Deteriorates Slightly in Kansas During February

Posted on 03/09/2017 10:18 AM

 

State statisticians report winter wheat conditions in Kansas and Nebraska deteriorated slightly in February, while conditions improved in Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado. Statisticians note warmth had an impact on crop growth in February.

In Oklahoma, statisticians report 65% of the wheat crop has been grazed, which compares to 50% last year and the five-year average of 40%. Similar data was not reported from the other Plains states.

State Very Poor Poor Fair Good Excellent
Percent
Kansas -
02/27/17
5
16
36
40
3
01/30/17
7
13
36
42
2
 
Oklahoma -
02/27/17
4
11
42
41
2
01/30/17
3
14
50
30
3
 
Texas - 02/27/17
4
16
46
29
5
1/30/17
5
22
44
24
5
 
Colorado - 02/27/17
6
21
33
37
3
01/30/17
5
16
43
33
3
 
Nebraska - 02/27/17
2
8
46
40
4
01/30/17
1
8
44
43
4

 

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: For the month of February 2017, temperatures averaged six to twelve degrees above normal across the entire State, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Most of the State remained dry, while portions of central and eastern Kansas received beneficial rainfall. The mild temperatures have been good for calving and some early fieldwork. Fertilizer application and weed management have begun in many areas. Topsoil moisture rated 21 percent very short, 34 short, 45 adequate, and 0 surplus. Subsoil moisture rated 21 percent very short, 35 short, 44 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Oklahoma: For Oklahoma, February was extremely warm and dry. A few rain storms in the middle of the month did little to ease the drought or high temperatures. According to the OCS Mesonet, 2017 was one of the hottest Februarys in Oklahoma’s history. Conditions of small grains were rated mostly fair to good. Winter wheat grazed reached 65 percent, up 15 points from the previous year Rye grazed reached 70 percent, down 1 point from the previous year.

Texas: Warm and windy weather continued across the state last week. Only the southern and eastern districts had measurable rainfall, reporting between 0.5 of an inch and 3.0 inches of precipitation. Days suitable for field work was 5.5, one day above the previous week. Small Grains: Winter wheat was rated mostly fair to good. The warm weather and precipitation during the previous two weeks have improved the wheat development, as it continues to progress in most parts of the state. Some producers were irrigating in areas of South Texas, where the rainfall has been scarce.

Colorado: Record high temperatures during February reduced snow cover significantly in eastern districts, although some western counties continued to receive seasonal snowfall. Warm, windy, and dry conditions were largely concerning for wheat and pasture condition in areas where adequate moisture hasn’t been received throughout the season. Reporters in eastern counties noted that some wheat is breaking dormancy due to warm temperatures. Warm weather has been favorable for livestock condition and early fieldwork. As of February 27, 2017, snowpack in Colorado was at 138 percent measured as percent of median snowfall.

Nebraska: For the month of February 2017, temperatures averaged six to eight degrees above normal across Nebraska, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Heavy snow occurred over northern portions of the State during the month. Temperatures peaked in 70’s during the third week, resulting in producers beginning preparations for spring planting. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 8 percent very short, 17 short, 68 adequate, and 7 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 9 percent very short, 21 short, 66 adequate, and 4 surplus.


 

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