Unusually Warm Temps Over the Corn Belt

Posted on 03/09/2017 10:20 AM

USDA's Joint Ag Weather Facility (JAWF) says significant rainfall is confined to the upper Great Lakes region. Elsewhere, unusually warm weather favors corn and soybean maturation and harvesting. Today’s high temperatures will exceed the 90-degree mark in parts of the southern Corn Belt, especially in Missouri.

In the South, flood recovery continues in the southern Mid-Atlantic coastal plain under a warm, dry weather regime. In stark contrast, worsening drought stretches from the northern Mississippi Delta to the southern Appalachians, aggravated by persistently warm, dry weather.

On the Plains, slightly cooler weather accompanies scattered showers in Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas. Farther south, however, record-setting warmth continues to promote fieldwork on the central and southern Plains, although soil moisture shortages are a growing concern with respect to winter wheat establishment.

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In the West, warm, dry weather is limited to the Four Corners region. In contrast, cool weather accompanies scattered showers across northern and central California and the Northwest. Although the cool, unsettled weather has curtailed fieldwork, rangeland, pastures and emerging winter grains are benefiting.

In its outlook, USDA says a weather pattern featuring Northwestern storminess and late-season warmth across the central and eastern U.S. will gradually break down. By week’s end, warmth will return to the western U.S., while lingering showers will be confined to the Pacific Northwest. Farther east, showers and thunderstorms will develop around mid-week from the southeastern Plains into the lower Great Lakes region. During the remainder of the week, rain will spread across the remainder of the eastern one-third of the U.S. Five-day rainfall totals could reach 1 to 3 inches from the lower Great Lakes region into New England. Most other parts of the country, including the Plains, Southwest and uipper Midwest, will receive little or no precipitation.


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