Initial Corn Condition Ratings Lower Than Year-Ago

Posted on 03/09/2017 10:22 AM

When USDA's weekly crop condition ratings are plugged into Pro Farmer's weighted (by production) Crop Condition Index (CCI; 0 to 500 point scale, with 500 representing perfect), it shows the first condition rating of the season 1.8 points lower than year-ago at 380.35. The Iowa and Illinois crops are rated better than year-ago, while Indiana has started the season below year-ago.

 

Pro Farmer Crop Condition Index

Corn

This week

Year-ago

Colorado *(0.99%)

3.87
3.85

Illinois (15.52%)

58.66
58.11

Indiana (7.06%)

26.04
27.07

Iowa (16.84%)

65.00
64.67

Kansas (3.96%)

14.50
12.67

Kentucky (1.67%)

6.17
5.82

Michigan (2.49%)

9.51
10.31

Minnesota 9.37%)

35.78
37.28

Missouri (3.60%)

13.66
11.66

Nebraska (11.79%)

44.79
42.76

N. Carolina (0.74%)

2.91
3.13

N. Dakota (2.49%)

9.84
11.11

Ohio (4.22%)

15.62
17.85

Pennsylvania (1.09%)

4.00
4.59

S. Dakota (5.74%)

21.81
20.05

Tennessee (0.92%)

3.59
3.52

Texas (1.98%)

7.51
7.50

Wisconsin (3.40%)

13.78
13.61

Corn total

380.35
382.15

* denotes percentage of total national corn crop production.

Iowa: Rain showers hindered fieldwork in Iowa during the week ending May 29, 2016, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 3.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Standing water was reported in some fields. Field activities included planting and replanting. Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 3 percent short, 82 percent adequate and 15 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 3 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus. The western third of Iowa continues to have the highest percentage of surplus subsoil.

Virtually all of Iowa’s corn crop has been planted. Corn emerged reached 90 percent, 2 days ahead of last year and five days ahead of normal. Seventy-seven percent of the corn crop was rated in good to excellent condition.

 

Illinois: Continued rain is hampering planting in southern Illinois, while warmer temperatures have helped crop emergence in central to northern Illinois. Statewide, the average temperature was 71.9 degrees, 6.5 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 1.09 inches, 0.05 inches above normal. There were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 29. Topsoil moisture supply was rated at 1 percent very short, 5 percent short, 73 percent adequate, and 21 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated at 3 percent short, 81 percent adequate, and 16 percent surplus.

Corn planted was at 94 percent, compared to the five-year average of 96 percent. Corn emerged was at 87 percent, compared t o 92 percent last year and the five-year average of 86 percent. Corn condition was rated 2 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 23 percent fair, 56 percent good, and 15 percent excellent.

 

Indiana: Farmers worked long hours to catch up on corn and soybean plantings while the weather was warm and dry, according to Greg Matli, Indiana State Statistician for the USDA’s NASS. Temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 degrees above normal and little precipitation began to dry out the soil, allowing farmers to work the fields. The statewide average temperature was at 71.0 degrees. Statewide precipitation was 0.37 inches, below normal by 0.71 inches. There were 5.7 days available for fieldwork for the week ending May 29, up 2.2 days from the previous week.

Regionally, corn planted was 93% in the North, 90% in Central, and 59% in the South. Corn emerged was 67% in the North, 64% in Central, and 35% in the South. While planting progress remains behind last year, it is on par with the five year average. Some fields were replanted this week due to poor emergence from the cold spell that occurred earlier in the planting season. Additionally, there are some concerns that more rain is needed to help the freshly planted corn crop emerge. The corn stands that have emerged are 69% in good to excellent condition. Side dressing of nitrogen and ammonia has begun.

Minnesota: Above average temperatures aided crop development, but multiple rain showers made it difficult to complete planting and cut hay in some areas of the state during the week ending May 29, 2016, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Frequent showers limited field activities across Minnesota, with 3.2 days suitable for fieldwork. Field activities for the week included planting, applying herbicides, and cutting hay. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 2 percent very short, 9 percent short, 77 percent adequate, and 12 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 1 percent very short, 10 percent short, 78 percent adequate, and 11 percent surplus.

Ninety-two percent of the Minnesota corn crop had emerged, a day behind last year, but 13 days ahead of the five-year average. Corn condition rated 71 percent good to excellent, up 6 percentage points from the previous week.


 

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