Kansas Wheat Conditions Improve as Crop Breaks Dormancy Early

February 29, 2016 03:40 PM

According to state crop reports, the condition of the winter wheat crop in Kansas improved during February, with 59% of the crop rated "good" to "excellent," compared to 55% a month ago and just 44% a year-ago. State reporters note warm temps resulted in a crop breaking dormancy earlier than usual. Meanwhile, the condition of the Oklahoma, Texas and Illinois crops declined slightly during February.

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
02/29/16
1
5
35
51
8
02/01/16
1
7
37
49
6
3/02/15
2
10
44
41
3
 
Okla. -
02/29/16
0
1
31
58
10
02/01/16
0
1
25
64
10
03/02/15
4
12
42
41
1
 
Texas -
02/29/16
2
13
45
31
9
02/01/16
2
12
37
35
14
03/02/15
3
9
42
37
9
 
Illinois -
02/29/16
1
5
36
47
11
02/04/16
2
5
28
55
10
03/02/15
1
12
40
45
2


Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: For the month of February 2016, temperatures averaged four to six degrees above normal, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. The spring-like conditions prompted winter wheat to break dormancy early. Rain was needed to support growth and development. Producers in southern counties were beginning spring fieldwork activities. The mild conditions have been good for the calving season. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 5 percent very short, 31 short, 63 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 6 percent very short, 24 short, 68 adequate, and 2 surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 1 percent very poor, 5 poor, 35 fair, 51 good and 8 excellent.

Oklahoma: Oklahoma experienced warm and dry weather for the month of February. The heaviest rains were received in the South Central and Southeast districts. According to the OCS Mesonet, the weather was mostly dry and warm, creating fire warnings for much of the state. The worst of which was a 17,000 acre fire north of Buffalo in Harper County. Precipitation across the state averaged 1.03 inches, ranging from 0.28 of an inch in the Panhandle district to 2.15 inches in the Southeast district. Statewide temperatures averaged in the mid 40’s, with the lowest recording of 2 degrees at Kenton on Wednesday, February 3rd and the highest recording of 91 degrees at Buffalo on Thursday, February 18th. Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were rated mostly adequate to short.

Texas: Most areas of the state received from trace amounts of precipitation to upwards of 3.0 inches of rainfall during the past week. Areas stretching from the Blacklands through South Central Texas, and through East Texas received from 2.0 inches up to 3.0 inches. Coastal Bend, South Texas, and Lower Valley received up to an inch of rainfall. In areas of the High Plains producers were concerned with above normal temperatures as wheat continued to progress out of the dormancy state. Statewide, wheat and oat conditions were mostly fair to good.

Illinois: Statewide, precipitation averaged 1.36 inches for the month, 0.57 inches below normal. The average temperature was 32.7 degrees, 2.5 degrees above normal. Topsoil moisture supply was rated at 1 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 20 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated at 1 percent short, 85 percent adequate and 14 percent surplus. Winter wheat condition was rated 1 percent very poor, 5 percent poor, 36 percent fair, 47 percent good and 11 percent excellent.